The Resource Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville ; translated by Arthur Goldhammer

Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville ; translated by Arthur Goldhammer

Label
Democracy in America
Title
Democracy in America
Statement of responsibility
Alexis de Tocqueville ; translated by Arthur Goldhammer
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
  • eng
  • fre
  • eng
Summary
An influential study of America's national government, egalitarian ideals, and character offers reflections on the effect of majority rule on the rights of individuals and provides insight into the rewards and responsibilities of a democratic government
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1805-1859
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Tocqueville, Alexis de
Dewey number
320.973
Illustrations
maps
Index
index present
LC call number
JK216
LC item number
.T713 2004
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Goldhammer, Arthur
Series statement
The library of America
Series volume
147
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Democracy
  • United States
  • United States
Label
Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville ; translated by Arthur Goldhammer
Link
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Ch. 1. The Outward Configuration of North America -- Ch. 2. On the Point of Departure and Its Importance for the Future of the Anglo-Americans -- Ch. 3. Social State of the Anglo-Americans -- Ch. 4. On the Principle of Popular Sovereignty in America -- Ch. 5. Necessity of Studying What Happens in Particular States Before Speaking of the Government of the Union -- Ch. 6. On Judicial Power in the United States and Its Effect on Political Society -- Ch. 7. On Political Judgment in the United States -- Ch. 8. On the Federal Constitution -- Ch. 1. Why It Is Strictly Accurate to Say That in the United States It Is the People Who Govern -- Ch. 2. Parties in the United States -- Ch. 3. On Freedom of the Press in the United States -- Ch. 4. On Political Association in the United States -- Ch. 5. On the Government of Democracy in America -- Ch. 6. What Are the Real Advantages to American Society of Democratic Government? -- Ch. 7. On the Omnipotence of the Majority in the United States and Its Effects -- Ch. 8. On That Which Tempers the Tyranny of the Majority in the United States -- Ch. 9. On the Principal Causes That Tend to Maintain the Democratic Republic in the United States -- Ch. 10. Some Considerations Concerning the Present State and Probable Future of the Three Races That Inhabit the Territory of the United States -- Pt. I. Influence of Democracy on the Evolution of the American Intellect -- Ch. 1. On the Philosophical Method of the Americans -- Ch. 2. On the Principal Source of Beliefs Among Democratic Peoples -- Ch. 3. Why the Americans Show More Aptitude and Taste for General Ideas Than Their English Forefathers -- Ch. 4. Why the Americans Have Never Been as Passionate as the French About General Ideas in Politics -- Ch. 5. How Religion Uses Democratic Instincts in the United States -- Ch. 6. On the Progress of Catholicism in the United States -- Ch. 7. What Makes the Mind of Democratic Peoples Receptive to Pantheism -- Ch. 8. How Democracy Suggests to the Americans the Idea of Man's Infinite Perfectibility -- Ch. 9. How the Example of the Americans Does Not Prove That a Democratic People Can Have No Aptitude for Science, Literature, or the Arts -- Ch. 10. Why Americans Devote Themselves More to the Practical Applications of Science Than to the Theory -- Ch. 11. In What Spirit Americans Cultivate the Arts -- Ch. 12. Why Americans Build Such Insignificant and Such Great Monuments at the Same Time -- Ch. 13. The Literary Aspect of Democratic Centuries -- Ch. 14. On the Literary Industry -- Ch. 15. Why the Study of Greek and Latin Is Particularly Useful in Democratic Societies -- Ch. 16. How American Democracy Has Changed the English Language -- Ch. 17. On Some Sources of Poetry in Democratic Nations -- Ch. 18. Why American Writers and Orators Are Often Bombastic -- Ch. 19. Some Observations on the Theater of Democratic Peoples -- Ch. 20. On Certain Tendencies Peculiar to Historians in Democratic Centuries -- Ch. 21. On Parliamentary Eloquence in the United States --
  • Pt. II. Influence of Democracy on the Sentiments of the Americans -- Ch. 1. Why Democratic Peoples Show a More Ardent and Enduring Love of Equality Than of Liberty -- Ch. 2. On Individualism in Democratic Countries -- Ch. 3. How Individualism Is More Pronounced at the End of a Democratic Revolution Than at Any Other Time -- Ch. 4. How Americans Combat Individualism with Free Institutions -- Ch. 5. On the Use That Americans Make of Association in Civil Life -- Ch. 6. On the Relation Between Associations and Newspapers -- Ch. 7. Relations Between Civil Associations and Political Associations -- Ch. 8. How Americans Combat Individualism with the Doctrine of Self-Interest Properly Understood -- Ch. 9. How Americans Apply the Doctrine of Self-Interest Properly Understood in the Matter of Religion -- Ch. 10. On the Taste for Material Well-Being in America -- Ch. 11. On the Particular Effects of the Love of Material Gratifications in Democratic Centuries -- Ch. 12. Why C
  • ertain Americans Exhibit Such Impassioned Spiritualism -- Ch. 13. Why Americans Seem So Restless in the Midst of Their Well-Being -- Ch. 14. How the Taste for Material Gratifications Is Combined in America with Love of Liberty and Concern About Public Affairs -- Ch. 15. How Religious Beliefs Sometimes Divert the American Soul Toward Immaterial Gratifications -- Ch. 16. How Excessive Love of Well-Being Can Impair It -- Ch. 17. How, in Times of Equality and Doubt, It Is Important to Set Distant Goals for Human Actions -- Ch. 18. Why All Respectable Occupations Are Reputed Honorable Among Americans -- Ch. 19. Why Nearly All Americans Are Inclined to Enter Industrial Occupations -- Ch. 20. How Industry Could Give Rise to an Aristocracy --
  • Pt. III. Influence of Democracy on Mores Properly So-Called -- Ch. 1. How Mores Become Milder as Conditions Become More Equal -- Ch. 2. How Democracy Simplifies and Eases Habitual Relations Among Americans -- Ch. 3. Why Americans Are So Slow to Take Offense in Their Country and So Quick to Take Offense in Ours -- Ch. 4. Consequences of the Three Previous Chapters -- Ch. 5. How Democracy Modifies Relations Between Servant and Master -- Ch. 6. How Democratic Institutions and Mores Tend to Raise Prices and Shorten the Terms of Leases -- Ch. 7. Influence of Democracy on Wages -- Ch. 8. Influence of Democracy on the Family -- Ch. 9. Raising Girls in the United States -- Ch. 10. How the Traits of the Girl Can Be Divined in the Wife -- Ch. 11. How Equality of Conditions Helps to Maintain Good Morals in America -- Ch. 12. How the Americans Understand the Equality of Man and Woman -- Ch. 13. How Equality Naturally Divides the Americans into a Multitude of Small Private Societies -- Ch. 14. Some Reflections on American Manners -- Ch. 15. On the Gravity of Americans and Why It Does Not Prevent Them from Acting Rashly -- Ch. 16. Why the National Vanity of the Americans Is More Restless and Argumentative Than That of the English -- Ch. 17. How Society in the United States Seems Both Agitated and Monotonous -- Ch. 18. On Honor in the United States and in Democratic Societies -- Ch. 19. Why There Are So Many Ambitious Men and So Few Great Ambitions in the United States -- Ch. 20. On Place-Hunting in Certain Democratic Nations -- Ch. 21. Why Great Revolutions Will Become Rare -- Ch. 22. Why Democratic Peoples Naturally Desire Peace and Democratic Armies Naturally Desire War -- Ch. 23. Which Class in Democratic Armies Is the Most Warlike and Revolutionary -- Ch. 24. What Makes Democratic Armies Weaker Than Other Armies at the Start of a Campaign but More Formidable in Protracted Warfare -- Ch. 25. On Discipline in Democratic Armies -- Ch. 26. Some Remarks on War in Democratic Societies -- Pt. IV. On the Influence that Democratic Ideas and Sentiments Exert on Political Society -- Ch. 1. Equality Naturally Gives Men a Taste for Free Institutions -- Ch. 2. Why the Ideas of Democratic Peoples About Government Naturally Favor the Concentration of Power -- Ch. 3. How the Sentiments of Democratic Peoples Accord with Their Ideas to Bring About a Concentration of Power -- Ch. 4. Concerning Certain Particular and Accidental Causes That Either Lead a Democratic People to Centralize Power or Divert Them From It -- Ch. 5. How Sovereign Power in Today's European Nations Is Increasing, Although Sovereigns Are Less Stable -- Ch. 6. What Kind of Despotism Democratic Nations Have to Fear -- Ch. 7. Continuation of the Preceding Chapters -- Ch. 8. General View of the Subject -- Tocqueville's Notes
Dimensions
21 cm.
Extent
xvi, 941 p.
Isbn
9781931082549
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2003061885
Other physical details
map
System control number
  • (OCoLC)52902451
  • 643291
  • (OCoLC)ocm52902451
  • 643291
Label
Democracy in America, Alexis de Tocqueville ; translated by Arthur Goldhammer
Link
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Ch. 1. The Outward Configuration of North America -- Ch. 2. On the Point of Departure and Its Importance for the Future of the Anglo-Americans -- Ch. 3. Social State of the Anglo-Americans -- Ch. 4. On the Principle of Popular Sovereignty in America -- Ch. 5. Necessity of Studying What Happens in Particular States Before Speaking of the Government of the Union -- Ch. 6. On Judicial Power in the United States and Its Effect on Political Society -- Ch. 7. On Political Judgment in the United States -- Ch. 8. On the Federal Constitution -- Ch. 1. Why It Is Strictly Accurate to Say That in the United States It Is the People Who Govern -- Ch. 2. Parties in the United States -- Ch. 3. On Freedom of the Press in the United States -- Ch. 4. On Political Association in the United States -- Ch. 5. On the Government of Democracy in America -- Ch. 6. What Are the Real Advantages to American Society of Democratic Government? -- Ch. 7. On the Omnipotence of the Majority in the United States and Its Effects -- Ch. 8. On That Which Tempers the Tyranny of the Majority in the United States -- Ch. 9. On the Principal Causes That Tend to Maintain the Democratic Republic in the United States -- Ch. 10. Some Considerations Concerning the Present State and Probable Future of the Three Races That Inhabit the Territory of the United States -- Pt. I. Influence of Democracy on the Evolution of the American Intellect -- Ch. 1. On the Philosophical Method of the Americans -- Ch. 2. On the Principal Source of Beliefs Among Democratic Peoples -- Ch. 3. Why the Americans Show More Aptitude and Taste for General Ideas Than Their English Forefathers -- Ch. 4. Why the Americans Have Never Been as Passionate as the French About General Ideas in Politics -- Ch. 5. How Religion Uses Democratic Instincts in the United States -- Ch. 6. On the Progress of Catholicism in the United States -- Ch. 7. What Makes the Mind of Democratic Peoples Receptive to Pantheism -- Ch. 8. How Democracy Suggests to the Americans the Idea of Man's Infinite Perfectibility -- Ch. 9. How the Example of the Americans Does Not Prove That a Democratic People Can Have No Aptitude for Science, Literature, or the Arts -- Ch. 10. Why Americans Devote Themselves More to the Practical Applications of Science Than to the Theory -- Ch. 11. In What Spirit Americans Cultivate the Arts -- Ch. 12. Why Americans Build Such Insignificant and Such Great Monuments at the Same Time -- Ch. 13. The Literary Aspect of Democratic Centuries -- Ch. 14. On the Literary Industry -- Ch. 15. Why the Study of Greek and Latin Is Particularly Useful in Democratic Societies -- Ch. 16. How American Democracy Has Changed the English Language -- Ch. 17. On Some Sources of Poetry in Democratic Nations -- Ch. 18. Why American Writers and Orators Are Often Bombastic -- Ch. 19. Some Observations on the Theater of Democratic Peoples -- Ch. 20. On Certain Tendencies Peculiar to Historians in Democratic Centuries -- Ch. 21. On Parliamentary Eloquence in the United States --
  • Pt. II. Influence of Democracy on the Sentiments of the Americans -- Ch. 1. Why Democratic Peoples Show a More Ardent and Enduring Love of Equality Than of Liberty -- Ch. 2. On Individualism in Democratic Countries -- Ch. 3. How Individualism Is More Pronounced at the End of a Democratic Revolution Than at Any Other Time -- Ch. 4. How Americans Combat Individualism with Free Institutions -- Ch. 5. On the Use That Americans Make of Association in Civil Life -- Ch. 6. On the Relation Between Associations and Newspapers -- Ch. 7. Relations Between Civil Associations and Political Associations -- Ch. 8. How Americans Combat Individualism with the Doctrine of Self-Interest Properly Understood -- Ch. 9. How Americans Apply the Doctrine of Self-Interest Properly Understood in the Matter of Religion -- Ch. 10. On the Taste for Material Well-Being in America -- Ch. 11. On the Particular Effects of the Love of Material Gratifications in Democratic Centuries -- Ch. 12. Why C
  • ertain Americans Exhibit Such Impassioned Spiritualism -- Ch. 13. Why Americans Seem So Restless in the Midst of Their Well-Being -- Ch. 14. How the Taste for Material Gratifications Is Combined in America with Love of Liberty and Concern About Public Affairs -- Ch. 15. How Religious Beliefs Sometimes Divert the American Soul Toward Immaterial Gratifications -- Ch. 16. How Excessive Love of Well-Being Can Impair It -- Ch. 17. How, in Times of Equality and Doubt, It Is Important to Set Distant Goals for Human Actions -- Ch. 18. Why All Respectable Occupations Are Reputed Honorable Among Americans -- Ch. 19. Why Nearly All Americans Are Inclined to Enter Industrial Occupations -- Ch. 20. How Industry Could Give Rise to an Aristocracy --
  • Pt. III. Influence of Democracy on Mores Properly So-Called -- Ch. 1. How Mores Become Milder as Conditions Become More Equal -- Ch. 2. How Democracy Simplifies and Eases Habitual Relations Among Americans -- Ch. 3. Why Americans Are So Slow to Take Offense in Their Country and So Quick to Take Offense in Ours -- Ch. 4. Consequences of the Three Previous Chapters -- Ch. 5. How Democracy Modifies Relations Between Servant and Master -- Ch. 6. How Democratic Institutions and Mores Tend to Raise Prices and Shorten the Terms of Leases -- Ch. 7. Influence of Democracy on Wages -- Ch. 8. Influence of Democracy on the Family -- Ch. 9. Raising Girls in the United States -- Ch. 10. How the Traits of the Girl Can Be Divined in the Wife -- Ch. 11. How Equality of Conditions Helps to Maintain Good Morals in America -- Ch. 12. How the Americans Understand the Equality of Man and Woman -- Ch. 13. How Equality Naturally Divides the Americans into a Multitude of Small Private Societies -- Ch. 14. Some Reflections on American Manners -- Ch. 15. On the Gravity of Americans and Why It Does Not Prevent Them from Acting Rashly -- Ch. 16. Why the National Vanity of the Americans Is More Restless and Argumentative Than That of the English -- Ch. 17. How Society in the United States Seems Both Agitated and Monotonous -- Ch. 18. On Honor in the United States and in Democratic Societies -- Ch. 19. Why There Are So Many Ambitious Men and So Few Great Ambitions in the United States -- Ch. 20. On Place-Hunting in Certain Democratic Nations -- Ch. 21. Why Great Revolutions Will Become Rare -- Ch. 22. Why Democratic Peoples Naturally Desire Peace and Democratic Armies Naturally Desire War -- Ch. 23. Which Class in Democratic Armies Is the Most Warlike and Revolutionary -- Ch. 24. What Makes Democratic Armies Weaker Than Other Armies at the Start of a Campaign but More Formidable in Protracted Warfare -- Ch. 25. On Discipline in Democratic Armies -- Ch. 26. Some Remarks on War in Democratic Societies -- Pt. IV. On the Influence that Democratic Ideas and Sentiments Exert on Political Society -- Ch. 1. Equality Naturally Gives Men a Taste for Free Institutions -- Ch. 2. Why the Ideas of Democratic Peoples About Government Naturally Favor the Concentration of Power -- Ch. 3. How the Sentiments of Democratic Peoples Accord with Their Ideas to Bring About a Concentration of Power -- Ch. 4. Concerning Certain Particular and Accidental Causes That Either Lead a Democratic People to Centralize Power or Divert Them From It -- Ch. 5. How Sovereign Power in Today's European Nations Is Increasing, Although Sovereigns Are Less Stable -- Ch. 6. What Kind of Despotism Democratic Nations Have to Fear -- Ch. 7. Continuation of the Preceding Chapters -- Ch. 8. General View of the Subject -- Tocqueville's Notes
Dimensions
21 cm.
Extent
xvi, 941 p.
Isbn
9781931082549
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
2003061885
Other physical details
map
System control number
  • (OCoLC)52902451
  • 643291
  • (OCoLC)ocm52902451
  • 643291

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